Writer Thoughts While Watching Lucifer

It’s your favorite binge-watching writer here! Today, we’re going to be covering Lucifer Morningstar and his wicked cool entourage.

Without further ado, here are some observations I had as a writer while watching “Lucifer” go about his devilish deeds.

1. Bad boys. Bad girls. Bad bois and NBs. We never get sick of them in stories, do we? Ever since Marlon Brando and James Dean swaggered around early Hollywood with their leather jackets and cigarettes, we all fall for the rockstar rebels. Ruby Rose with their tattoos? Erik Killmonger, the just yet brooding bad boy. Even Megara from freaking Hercules! There’s something about being bad that’s just so good. It calls to the rebel in all of us who wants to break away from routine and have a wild adventure, forbidden or not.

2. I didn’t realize slogans and catchphrases were so effective until I found myself cackling every time Lucifer drawled : “tell me, what is your deepest desire?” They’re not cliche if you use them for good effect and timing. And it makes sense in Lucifer’s story world. He’s the devil, after all. It’s not just a badass phrase. It’s also a hint that his otherworldly powers are sinking in.

3. Making badasses vulnerable, in more ways than just the emotional kind. It’s kinda like why Superman has kryptonite or Batman is just a regular human in a bat suit. If your superpowered hero can’t be defeated by a single entity (i.e., literally the devil), then throwing a lil kryptonite (not JUST the love interest, but the entire “Lucifer is turning human, oh no!” bit), it makes it more interesting. Because there’s…

4. Stakes! Not just the vampire kind.

I mean high stakes. A real, viscerally thrilling sense of actual danger. Even immortality has to have a couple flaws. That is, unless…

5. Your villain is your arch nemesis/ polar oppsite yet the same match. You know what I’m talking about. Like how Sherlock can’t be beat unless you’re Moriarty or Irene Adler. I mean like how Superman has Lex Luthor and Glass has that Unbreakable dude and Merlin’s got Morgana. Batman v Joker. The hero cannot be safe until you reach the end, and even then…

6. Sure, it’s all fun having a good guy character who has bad things happen to them and ends up suffering but is redeemed by a just reward at the end. You know what else is fun, fellow semi-sadistic writers?

Writing characters who maybe, even the slightest bit, just might’ve deserved it. Like the devil obviously has probably done a few bad, torturous deeds, correct?  It makes the part where they’re “brooding about their past sins” (figurative or otherwise), quite tempting to watch.

7. Buddy cop trope, still in.

That includes the inevitable romantic tension.

And angels and demons…

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